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Rare Weather Phenomenon At The Grand Canyon Produces Awesome Photos

Grand Canyon Temperature Inversion Featured

A temperature inversion over the weekend caused the Grand Canyon to fill up with clouds and it looked spectacular.

This happened over the weekend at the Grand Canyon and produced some of the most awesome photographs ever taken in the region due to a rare weather phenomenon. Ranger Erin Whitaker explains the science behind the fog descending into the canyon:

”On average temperature inversions happen once or twice a year at the Grand Canyon, but they very rarely produce results like this with cloud waterfalls happening on average once every decade. The reason that the inversion looked so good this time was because it occurred on a clear sunny day and managed to envelope the entire canyon, which is again almost unheard of.”

Apparently a bunch of tourists visiting the canyon were really annoyed that the clouds were in their face as they assumed that this was just a normal weather pattern that showed up all the time and spoiled their fun. When the rangers explained that it was pretty much a once in a lifetime occurrence – and indeed that some of them had waited their entire lives to see it themselves – the tourists seemed a lot happier and raced to the canyon to take a bunch of snaps themselves, some of which you can see below and on the following page. Fickle huh?

Most of these are taken at Mather Point on the Grand Canyon.

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